3D Models Related Images

Stepwise dissection of the left cerebral hemisphere G-L

Surgical Correlation

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G, Colored pins have been placed along a line that corresponds to the lower margin of the insula, which is located deep to the superior temporal sulcus. A blue arrow has been placed on the foramen of Monro, which is located deep to the central part of the insula. The white arrow is located at the site where the upper end of the ascending ramus of the cingulate sulcus reaches the superior hemispheric border. The ascending ramus courses on the medial surface along the posterior margin of the paracentral lobule. H, The anterior limb of the internal capsule is located between the lentiform nucleus, formed by the putamen and globus pallidus, and the caudate nucleus. The posterior limb is located between the thalamus and lentiform nucleus. The genu of the internal capsule is located just lateral to the foramen of Monro. The choroidal fissure, along which the choroid plexus is attached, is situated between the fornix and thalamus. I, The temporal horn and hippocampus are located medial to the middle temporal gyrus, a segment of which has been removed. The hippocampus sits in the floor of the temporal horn. The atrium is deep to the supramarginal gyrus. The black arrow is on the foramen of Monro. The white arrow is located where the upper end of the ascending ramus of the cingulate sulcus reaches the superior hemispheric border. The yellow arrow is where the upper end of the parieto-occipital sulcus reaches the superior border. J, The remaining bridge of the superior temporal gyrus located superficial to the junction of the atrium and temporal horn has been removed. K, Posterior view of the left hemisphere. The splenium is located deep in the interhemispheric fissure. The parieto-occipital and calcarine sulcus converge behind the splenium to give the medial surface a Y-shaped configuration. The parieto-occipital sulcus separates the pre-cuneus and cuneus, and the calcarine sulcus separates the cuneus and lingula. L, The parietal lobe, above the level of the calcarine sulcus, has been removed. The upper lip of the calcarine sulcus, formed by the cuneus, has been removed to expose the lingula that forms the lower bank of the calcarine sulcus. The calcar avis is a prominence in the lower part of the medial atrial wall overlying the calcarine sulcus. (Images courtesy of AL Rhoton, Jr.)

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