3D Models Related Images

Basal Surface of the Temporal and Occipital Lobes From Two Different Brains E-H

Surgical Correlation

Tags

E, The part of the posterior uncal segment below the uncal notch and the medial part of the parahippocampal gyrus have been removed to expose the lower surface of the upper half of the posterior segment that blends posteriorly into the beaded dentate gyrus. The fimbria is exposed above the dentate gyrus. The head of the hippocampus folds into the posterior segment of the uncus. The choroidal fissure located between the thalamus and fimbria extends along the lateral margin of the lateral geniculate body. F, The hippocampus and dentate gyrus have been removed while preserving the fimbria and choroid plexus attached along the choroidal fissure. The choroid plexus is attached on one side to the fimbria and on the opposite side to the lower margin of the thalamus. The amygdala forms the anterior wall of the temporal horn and fills the majority of the anterior segment of the uncus. The inferior choroidal point, the lower end of the choroidal fissure and choroid plexus, is located behind the uncus. G, The fimbria and choroid plexus have been removed to expose the roof of the temporal horn. The lower part of the anterior uncal segment has been removed to expose the amygdala. A small portion of the posterior segment sitting below the optic tract has been preserved. The inferior choroidal point, the most anterior attachment of the choroid plexus in the temporal horn and the lower end of the choroidal fissure, is located behind the head of the hippocampus in front of the lateral geniculate body and at the posterior edge of the cerebral peduncle. The tapetum of the corpus callosum forms the roof and lateral wall of the atrium. H, The tapetum fibers have been removed to expose the fibers of the optic radiation arising from the lateral geniculate body and passing across the roof and around the lateral wall of the temporal horn and the lateral wall of the atrium. Only a thin layer of tapetal fibers separate the optic radiations from the temporal horn and atrium as they pass posteriorly to reach the calcarine sulcus. The cuneus forms the upper bank and the lingula forms the lower bank of the calcarine sulcus. (Images courtesy of AL Rhoton, Jr.)

Top
You can make a difference: donate now. The Neurosurgical Atlas depends almost entirely on your donations: donate now.